Condition

Keratoconus refers to a condition wherein there is a degeneration of the structure of the cornea, which is the transparent layer forming the front of the eye. This asymmetry is caused by a thinning of the cornea that forces the eye to bulge forward.

Keratoconus can lead to distorted and blurred vision that can worsen over time. As a result, patients experience sensitivity to light, and difficulty seeing at night. Most affected are individuals between 10 to 25 years of age, which chances of developing the condition increasing if it runs in the family. Importantly, keratoconus can worsen over time, so early detention is key.

Treatment

Corneal Crosslinking

Corneal Crosslinking

Corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a leading treatment for keratoconus and was developed in 1998 by Theo Seiler, MD. The treatment has been shown in numerous clinical trials to strengthen the eye’s clear surface (cornea) through the application of riboflavin, a form of vitamin-B2, followed by treatment with ultraviolet A (UV-A) light.

Noting that the cornea is made up of millions of fibers that are linked together to maintain the corneas dull shape, the aim of corneal crosslinking is to strengthen the cornea by increasing the number of “anchors” that bond collagen fibers together. Much like how a sweater relies on the hundreds of threads that are woven together to maintain its structure, keratoconus occurs when the links between corneal fibers are weakened ultimately altering the corneas shape.

Minimally invasive, the treatment that involves administration drops of a vitamin solution called riboflavin to your cornea with the aim of strengthening and stabilizing the shape of your cornea. The saturated cornea will then be exposed to UV light which activates the solution. The drops and light work together to make the bonds in the cornea stronger, preventing further progression.

Intacs

Intacs

Intacs corneal inserts, sometimes called implants, are a minimally invasive surgical option used primarily for the treatment of keratoconus. Intacs are two tiny, clear crescent-shaped pieces of a plastic polymer that are inserted into the cornea to reshape the front surface of the eye.

For keratoconus patients, Intacs works by flattening the steep part of the cornea or cone as some call it to reduce vision distortions. Intacs are made of the same biocompatible material found in intraocular lenses used for cataract surgery, so there is little to no risk of adverse effects from the material. The procedure lasts about 15 minutes per eye and uses corneal implants are designed for long-term vision correction.

Intacs are a popular choice among patients given that they can always be removed for good or replaced with different size implants as your prescription changes with age. If you have Intacs removed, vision tends to return to the way it was before surgery within three months. Those receiving replacement Intacs have attained good visual results describing their vision as “crisper & clearer,” and no serious problems with repeating the procedure have been reported.

Corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a leading treatment for keratoconus and was developed in 1998 by Theo Seiler, MD. The treatment has been shown in numerous clinical trials to strengthen the eye’s clear surface (cornea) through the application of riboflavin, a form of vitamin-B2, followed by treatment with ultraviolet A (UV-A) light.

Noting that the cornea is made up of millions of fibers that are linked together to maintain the corneas dull shape, the aim of corneal crosslinking is to strengthen the cornea by increasing the number of “anchors” that bond collagen fibers together. Much like how a sweater relies on the hundreds of threads that are woven together to maintain its structure, keratoconus occurs when the links between corneal fibers are weakened ultimately altering the corneas shape.

Minimally invasive, the treatment that involves administration drops of a vitamin solution called riboflavin to your cornea with the aim of strengthening and stabilizing the shape of your cornea. The saturated cornea will then be exposed to UV light which activates the solution. The drops and light work together to make the bonds in the cornea stronger, preventing further progression.

Intacs corneal inserts, sometimes called implants, are a minimally invasive surgical option used primarily for the treatment of keratoconus. Intacs are two tiny, clear crescent-shaped pieces of a plastic polymer that are inserted into the cornea to reshape the front surface of the eye.

For keratoconus patients, Intacs works by flattening the steep part of the cornea or cone as some call it to reduce vision distortions. Intacs are made of the same biocompatible material found in intraocular lenses used for cataract surgery, so there is little to no risk of adverse effects from the material. The procedure lasts about 15 minutes per eye and uses corneal implants are designed for long-term vision correction.

Intacs are a popular choice among patients given that they can always be removed for good or replaced with different size implants as your prescription changes with age. If you have Intacs removed, vision tends to return to the way it was before surgery within three months. Those receiving replacement Intacs have attained good visual results describing their vision as “crisper & clearer,” and no serious problems with repeating the procedure have been reported.

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